Liam Mathews

Liam Mathews is the Watercooler's Senior Editor. He's written for Esquire, Gold Derby, TV Guide, and Fast Company, among other outlets. Previously, he was a Reviews and Recommendations Editor at TV Guide. Follow him on Twitter: @liamaathews.
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Too Hot to Handle

If the summer heat is cooking your brain, finish it off by throwing it on the grill that is Too Hot to Handle. There’s an all new season to binge, and you’ll only regret it if you actually feel guilt from your guilty pleasures.

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Moonstruck

Warm and comforting, Moonstruck feels like spending time with people you love. It does exactly what you want a movie like this to do, which is to warm your heart, make you laugh, and feel a little wistful. It’s perfect.

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The Watercooler Guide to Tuca & Bertie

A sleeper hit with a cult following that’s grown across social media, the animated grown-up comedy starring Tiffany Haddish and Ali Wong drops its third season July 10th, 2022 — this time on HBO Max. The clever one-of-a-kind show was canceled by Netflix before making an unlikely return on Adult Swim. Here’s what you need

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Lisey’s Story

Lisey’s Story is an enchanting, frightening tale of magic and memory that’s in the upper echelon of Stephen King adaptations.

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Master of None Presents: Moments in Love

Moments in Love is an impressive reinvention of Master of None that gives a beautifully shot look into the most intimate parts of life. It has a lot of style and a lot of substance.

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The Mosquito Coast

Watching The Mosquito Coast, you get the sense that Apple TV+ was trying to make its version of Netflix’s immensely popular thriller series Ozark. And it succeeded.

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The Best of What’s New on Netflix: May 2021

From Zach Snyder and Ryan Murphy’s latest to an all-star Hitchcockian thriller, May 2021 has some particularly promising new Netflix Originals.

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Shadow and Bone

Shadow and Bone is an immersive fantasy series that will make you care about its characters as much as its mythology. It’s well-written, well-acted, and looks beautiful.

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This is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist

Producers Colin and Nick Barnicle pace their true crime whodunit for maximum entertainment value, laying out pieces of evidence that build up to twists and reveals that make you feel like you’re watching The Departed.

Liam Mathews

Liam Mathews is the Watercooler's Senior Editor. He's written for Esquire, Gold Derby, TV Guide, and Fast Company, among other outlets. Previously, he was a Reviews and Recommendations Editor at TV Guide. Follow him on Twitter: @liamaathews.
Featured Image

A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

Read More »
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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

Read More »
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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

Read More »
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The Big Door Prize

A fresh, lighthearted comedy that doubles as a philosophical sci-fi mystery, The Big Door Prize’s biggest question is that regardless of how much we have, are we ever truly satisfied? And that’s a poignant query in our consumer-driven, must-document-every-moment-on-social-media world.

2 what-you-need-to-know-about-impeachment-american-crime-story
Featured Image

A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

Read More »
Featured Image

A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

Featured Image

Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

Read More »
Featured Image

The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

Featured Image

The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

Featured Image

A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

Read More »
Featured Image

What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

Featured Image

From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

Read More »
Featured Image

The Big Door Prize

A fresh, lighthearted comedy that doubles as a philosophical sci-fi mystery, The Big Door Prize’s biggest question is that regardless of how much we have, are we ever truly satisfied? And that’s a poignant query in our consumer-driven, must-document-every-moment-on-social-media world.

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