Patricia Danaher

Patricia Danaher is a writer, producer, ecopsychologist and Golden Globe Juror who has written for The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and many others. Currently writing her doctorate, she works with those suffering bereavement and has developed rituals and grief kits to help those in mourning. Her site: Rituals for the Living.
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Dead to Me Creator Liz Feldman on Death & Comedy in the Time of Corona

For someone who has spent most of her professional life writing comedy, Liz Feldman, creator of Dead to Me, has had death on her mind for a long time. The Emmy winner wrote jokes for Ellen Degeneres for several years, including for her Oscars hosting gigs, and has been in the world of television since

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Unorthodox

A surprising and moving thriller about an unhappily married young Hasidic woman who dares to flee her suffocating life and marriage in an ultra-orthodox Brooklyn community.

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Dead to Me

At a time when there is too much actual death everywhere in real life, Dead to Me is a tonic with both the unapologetic sharpness of the humor combined with its emotional groundedness.

Patricia Danaher

Patricia Danaher is a writer, producer, ecopsychologist and Golden Globe Juror who has written for The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and many others. Currently writing her doctorate, she works with those suffering bereavement and has developed rituals and grief kits to help those in mourning. Her site: Rituals for the Living.
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Why Star Trek: Picard Works Better as a Binge

To understand the power of the Star Trek franchise, binge watch Picard. The time is right.

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Dolores

A gripping history lesson that also sheds light on the methods, risks, and compromises required to organize and sustain a movement.

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WTF: WandaVision Episode 8 “Previously On”

This week’s penultimate episode seemed to move the series back into feature-film territory, with exposition via flashback sequences to fill in the gaps between the movie franchise and the series.

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I Am Greta

Surprising and inspiring, I Am Greta is a testament to the power of one voice — no matter the age.  Watch it with the disenchanted young student in your life.

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The Map of Tiny Perfect Things

This YA love story uses its time-loop premise to explore the human condition and how time defines us in ways we can’t perceive, because we’re too close to it.

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Belgravia

A riveting show that will delight any fan of Downton Abbey, Belgravia marries a gripping story with compelling characters, lush sets, and beautiful costumes, proving that when it comes to costume dramas, Julian Fellowes is simply the best.

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Jack Whitehall: Travels with My Father

Though part of traveling is being able to tick off historical sites and iconic landmarks, the other part of it is about who you share it with and how these experiences impact your relationship.

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WTF: WandaVision Episode 7 “Breaking the Fourth Wall”

We’ve reached the present day in terms of television influences, with touches of The Office and Modern Family, both known for the gimmick referred to in the episode’s title.

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Start-Up (Seutateueop)

Every great success starts small. But if you don’t fix the bugs in the source code, they can come back to haunt you later—in life and in start-ups.

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We are Lady Parts

This is a funny, endearing, fresh show that demonstrates what proper representation looks like.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

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