Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
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Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

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When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

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The Big Door Prize

A fresh, lighthearted comedy that doubles as a philosophical sci-fi mystery, The Big Door Prize’s biggest question is that regardless of how much we have, are we ever truly satisfied? And that’s a poignant query in our consumer-driven, must-document-every-moment-on-social-media world.

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

If you solely go by the trailer, Colin Farrell’s new Apple TV series might seem like a familiar L.A. noir: A private detective named John Sugar gets hired by a legendary Hollywood producer to investigate the disappearance of his granddaughter, and soon finds himself unraveling a wicked web of family secrets. Apple TV+ A genre

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You’re the Worst

Through the eyes of two cynics who seem doomed to be alone, You’re the Worst embraces the complexity of modern relationships and the many emotional layers they surface. It’s also an accurate and empathetic portrait of what it’s like to live with clinical depression.

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The stars of Manhunt on the history we did not learn

It’s a story that none of us learned in history classes, and it unfolds as a taut, complex conspiracy thriller — one that raises all new questions. Set in 1865, Manhunt focuses on the aftermath of one of America’s most tragic events: the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. With all of the biopics, TV shows, and

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Mary & George

A clever, dark and salacious historical drama that brings a much overlooked chapter of European history to vivid life. Mary & George is a richly drawn, rough and raunchy story about the quest for power – and survival – in 16th century England.

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The Bold Type

The Bold Type centers female friendship and takes on many of the issues facing young women today, but it doesn’t leave out the escapism and the fun.

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The Eyes of Tammy Faye

As silly as Tammy Faye Bakker seemed on the surface, behind the layers of make-up and over-the-top TV persona was a strong, resilient woman, someone whose story sheds light on the growing power and greed of mass-marketed evangelicals.

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Who’s Likely to Win – and Who Could Upset – This Year’s Emmy Awards?

Who’s likely to win — and who could upset — this year’s Emmy Awards.

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Sex Education

This hilarious and endearing teen dramedy will pull at your heartstrings and also make you burst out laughing. You may even learn a bit about sex and relationships.

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International Teen Shows to Stream after Sex Education

Thanks to the miracle of streaming, there is now a whole bevy of international teen shows to watch, focusing on issues that are both universal and unique to their country of origin.

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Somebody Feed Phil

Despite being in foreign places and navigating unfamiliar cultures, Rosenthal demonstrates to his viewers just how food connects people from all over the world.

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Come From Away

If you want to understand the impact of 9/11 but all the coverage is getting you down, Come from Away should lift your spirits and renew your hope.

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Worth

Worth puts a renewed focus on the attacks of Sept. 11 and the aftermath of a country in mourning. There is plenty of sadness, but also big moral questions to ponder and some great performances by the talented cast.

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What You Need to Know About Impeachment: American Crime Story

Each season of FX’s American Crime Story franchise, executive producer Ryan Murphy and his team of collaborators dramatize a true crime that dominated headlines in the ‘90s. It’s renowned for finding fresh, compelling angles that re-evaluate well-known stories while providing juicy parts for ambitious actors. The first season, The People v. O.J. Simpson, came out

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