Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
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Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

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When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

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Perfect Days

A meditation on finding beauty in the ordinary and dignity in manual labor, Perfect Days serves as a lesson as well as a blueprint on how to live a fulfilling and meaningful life. It underscores the importance of finding solace in solitude and happiness from the simple act of living.

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We are Lady Parts

This is a funny, endearing, fresh show that demonstrates what proper representation looks like.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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The Family Stone

An all-star classic that inflicts just enough discomfort to feel cathartic because of its familiarity. You’ll feel like a member of this functioning dysfunctional family.

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Dash & Lily

If all the usual formulaic holiday movies are starting to blend into each other, this YA Christmas love story is refreshingly different.

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My Octopus Teacher

A stunning, often magical and emotional documentary that inspires awe and empathy, My Octopus Teacher brings a personal narrative to a nature documentary and captures the brilliance of a familiar sea creature like nothing before it.

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Why are We So Obsessed with the NXIVM Cult?

As you might have heard, this year has seen the premiere of not one but two premium cable series focused on the rise and fall of NXIVM, the cult (or self-help organization, or pyramid scheme, depending on your point of view) at the center of an ongoing criminal investigation and court battle. First there was

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The Women Who Make The Queen’s Gambit Worth Watching

There’s a scene in the new Netflix series The Queen’s Gambit when a Life magazine reporter asks teenage chess prodigy Beth Harmon (played by Anya Taylor-Joy) why the game appeals to her so much. Are the King and Queen pieces stand-ins for the parents she lost? No, she says, it was the board. “It’s an

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The Social Dilemma

This doc will make you think twice before picking up your phone to check Twitter for the hundredth time in a hour, and that’s a good thing.

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Borat Subsequent Moviefilm

Within the realm of Sacha Baron Cohen-level absurdity is this coming-of-age story of a young woman who breaks out of a patriarchal cocoon to find that female free will does exist.

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Roadkill

Political leaders dedicating their waking hours to dodging scandals are not native to the U.S., but they’re more fun to watch when playing out in a fictional version from the other side of the pond.

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