Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
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Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

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When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

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Oscar Broadcasts Then and Now: How the Academy Awards Have Changed

The Academy has drawn criticism for changing the format of the Oscars this year, but it’s not the first time they’ve switched things up.

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King Richard

A riveting and thoughtful look at all of the extraordinary members of the Williams family, King Richard is the rare Oscar caliber film that entertains as it inspires, shedding new light on the lives of two of the most iconic athletes of our time and what they and their parents had to overcome.

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No Exit

A slow-paced, unpredictable thriller with a surprise twist, No Exit challenges the viewer as it tests its protagonist to overcome her painful past. The chilling world and intense final act make the movie a must-watch.

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Severance

Severance is unlike any other show on TV right now. It builds slowly, drawing you in with stylish minutiae, but then intensifies, goes deeper, and becomes more paranoia-inducing with each successive episode.

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An Ode to Midge and Susie: The Real Love Story of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Midge’s suitors may be a more obvious focal point of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, but the real love story of the show is the one between her and Susie.

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Dive into the Texas Chainsaw Massacre-verse

It’s time to rev up those chainsaws because Leatherface is back, and this time he’s ready to take down some gentrifying hipsters. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre film franchise is getting a new entry with the creative title Texas Chainsaw Massacre, a direct sequel to the original 1974 film premiering on Netflix this Friday, Feb. 18.

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The Worst Person in the World

The Worst Person in the World is a fluidly told story not about love, but instead about self-awareness, acceptance, and the persistent insecurity that accompanies the pursuit of both.

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Letterkenny

Contrary to typical portrayals of small-town folks, the residents of Letterkenny are quick-witted and fully aware of broader social issues. Though they trade unrelenting insults, the warring factions come together more than once to defend one of their own.

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The Tinder Swindler

The Tinder Swindler starts as a too-good-to-be-true love story and quickly evolves into a revenge thriller, then a cautionary tale. Though this serves as a reminder that one should trust their gut and be on the lookout for red flags, it’s also a story of perseverance.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

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The Big Door Prize

A fresh, lighthearted comedy that doubles as a philosophical sci-fi mystery, The Big Door Prize’s biggest question is that regardless of how much we have, are we ever truly satisfied? And that’s a poignant query in our consumer-driven, must-document-every-moment-on-social-media world.

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