Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
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Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

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When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

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Lisa Frankenstein

A fresh spin on the campy monster comedy that fully embraces the absurdities of its source material, Lisa Frankenstein subverts familiar tropes and charts its own imaginative path, ultimately moving the genre forward.

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Navalny

In the wake of his death in a Russian prison, Navalny is a timely, tense real life espionage thriller with a call to action.  

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The New Look

A lavish historical drama set in Nazi-occupied Paris during WWII, The New Look contrasts the horrors of war with the opulence of post-War French society while underscoring the moral dilemmas faced by the two cultural icons of the time: Christian Dior (Ben Mendelsohn) and Coco Chanel (Juliette Binoche). 

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AlRawabi School for Girls

AlRawabi School for Girls is a binge-worthy teen drama that is not only well written, but features a stellar cast of newcomers. While the plot is fairly universal, the insight it offers into Jordanian culture is what makes it stand out.

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Tokyo Vice

On one level, Tokyo Vice is the story of one man’s kamikaze mission to bring down the Yakuza. But it’s also a mesmerizing noir drama that unfolds into a tense thriller — and ultimately serves as an important reminder that freedom of the press is worth fighting for.

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A Valentine’s Day Watchlist for Every Mood

The inescapable Valentine’s Day hype creates tumult for many while opening up a whole new  dimension of decision paralysis: What, exactly, to watch? To help you navigate the overwhelm of new releases and resurfaced romcoms, our writers sifted out the best movies and TV series to watch based on your mood and status. Transport Me

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Killers of the Flower Moon Stars on the Film’s Resonance Today

In a Watercooler interview, two stars of the Killers of the Flower Moon share how they connected with their characters, how the film resonates with the issues of today, and which movies shaped them the most growing up.

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Eye-Openers: Oscar’s Best Documentary Contenders

Often overlooked in the sea of awards season glitz, the Academy’s finalists in the Best Documentary category become history’s time capsules. Many of them have also proven to be prophetic, exposing insights and issuing forewarnings from the front lines of urgent issues, from climate change (An Inconvenient Truth) to gun control (Bowling for Columbine) to

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Doctor Slump

Things will likely work out the way it’s supposed to on Doctor Slump, but for a show of this ilk, it’s the journey that’s important and not the destination. For that, it’s a cathartic viewing experience for anyone in a slump – with a few laughs to lighten the mood.

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We are Lady Parts

This is a funny, endearing, fresh show that demonstrates what proper representation looks like.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

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