Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
Featured Image

Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

Read More »
Featured Image

When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

No items found
Featured Image

A Black Lady Sketch Show

A Black Lady Sketch Show is a fun, funny, and smart way to spend 30 minutes. Don’t be mad if you find yourself binging the entire series in one sitting.

Featured Image

Origin Story: How Friends Became the Ultimate Watercooler Hit

After a year-long delay due to the pandemic, the much-anticipated Friends Reunion Special finally has a “stream date”:  Thursday, May 27th, a tribute to its original “Must-See TV” night.  The big event has already driven legions of fans sign up for HBOMax, turning the service into “Must Stream TV.” David Janollari was a young development

Read More »
Featured Image

The Sons of Sam: A Descent into Darkness

The subtitle isn’t just referring to David Berkowitz’s murderous rampage, but one investigator’s never-ending quest for the truth.

Featured Image

Stream and Scream: The Best Horror Movie Sequels

In honor of yet another Saw sequel, we present some of the best horror movie sequels to stream. When there’s money to be made, horror villains, no matter how shriveled, dead, or decapitated, always manage to return.

Featured Image

Vincenzo

Looking for an action-adventure, mafia epic, kooky comedy, or romantic thriller? This unconventional K-drama checks all the boxes.

Featured Image

The Mosquito Coast

Watching The Mosquito Coast, you get the sense that Apple TV+ was trying to make its version of Netflix’s immensely popular thriller series Ozark. And it succeeded.

Featured Image

The Best of What’s New on Netflix: May 2021

From Zach Snyder and Ryan Murphy’s latest to an all-star Hitchcockian thriller, May 2021 has some particularly promising new Netflix Originals.

Featured Image

Infinity Train

A thoughtful PG series full of imaginative designs and compelling, layered characters, Infinity Train finds the sweet spot between deeper philosophical themes and lighter, more whimsical fare.

Featured Image

IMPACT with Gal Gadot

After a year of devastating news that has so many feeling hopeless, IMPACT brings a much-needed jolt of inspiration.

2 judas-and-the-black-messiah-how-impactful-work-still-leaves-black-youth-behind
Featured Image

The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

Featured Image

What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

Featured Image

Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

Read More »
Featured Image

From Aristocrat to Waiter in a Grand Hotel: A Gentleman in Moscow

It’s 1920s Moscow, four years after the start of the Russian Revolution. The aristocracy has been put on trial, staring down their inevitable doom. Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, is sentenced by a Bolshevik tribunal for “social parasitism” — the crime of living off of the efforts of others. His fate is surely death,

Read More »
Featured Image

The Big Door Prize

A fresh, lighthearted comedy that doubles as a philosophical sci-fi mystery, The Big Door Prize’s biggest question is that regardless of how much we have, are we ever truly satisfied? And that’s a poignant query in our consumer-driven, must-document-every-moment-on-social-media world.

Featured Image

The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

If you solely go by the trailer, Colin Farrell’s new Apple TV series might seem like a familiar L.A. noir: A private detective named John Sugar gets hired by a legendary Hollywood producer to investigate the disappearance of his granddaughter, and soon finds himself unraveling a wicked web of family secrets. Apple TV+ A genre

Read More »
Featured Image

You’re the Worst

Through the eyes of two cynics who seem doomed to be alone, You’re the Worst embraces the complexity of modern relationships and the many emotional layers they surface. It’s also an accurate and empathetic portrait of what it’s like to live with clinical depression.

Featured Image

The stars of Manhunt on the history we did not learn

It’s a story that none of us learned in history classes, and it unfolds as a taut, complex conspiracy thriller — one that raises all new questions. Set in 1865, Manhunt focuses on the aftermath of one of America’s most tragic events: the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. With all of the biopics, TV shows, and

Read More »
Featured Image

Mary & George

A clever, dark and salacious historical drama that brings a much overlooked chapter of European history to vivid life. Mary & George is a richly drawn, rough and raunchy story about the quest for power – and survival – in 16th century England.

Scroll to Top