Taneasha White

Taneasha White is a Black, Queer writer with a love for both words and community. Taneasha is the founding editor of UnSung Literary Magazine, and you can find some of her written work in VeryWell, Prism, Rewire.News, and more.
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Judas and The Black Messiah: How Impactful Work Still Leaves Black Youth Behind

It’s nominated for six Oscars, just earned a BAFTA for star Daniel Kaluuya’s performance, and made history as the first film with an entirely Black team of producers to earn a Best Picture nomination from the Academy. But is the history depicted in Judas and the Black Messiah a completely reliable picture? Directed by Shaka

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When Masculinity Meets Trauma: How Art Mirrors Life in Da 5 Bloods

The prevalent overarching themes of PTSD and harmful masculinity are interwoven very closely in Spike Lee’s latest project, mirroring star Chadwick Boseman’s secret fight with cancer while making the movie.

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Perfect Days

A meditation on finding beauty in the ordinary and dignity in manual labor, Perfect Days serves as a lesson as well as a blueprint on how to live a fulfilling and meaningful life. It underscores the importance of finding solace in solitude and happiness from the simple act of living.

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We are Lady Parts

This is a funny, endearing, fresh show that demonstrates what proper representation looks like.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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Watch These Sopranos Episodes to Appreciate The Many Saints of Newark

Thanks to the recently released prequel film The Many Saints of Newark, a lot of viewers are rediscovering—or even discovering for the first time—the brilliance of The Sopranos (which scored record ratings on HBO Max in the wake of the film’s release). In case you don’t have time to binge all six seasons of the

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On My Block

A clever, witty, and endearing look at the lives of inner-city teenagers that will make you laugh out loud but also sob uncontrollably. On My Block is the perfect blend of romance, drama, and comedy, a true standout in the world of teen drama. 

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What to Watch After Squid Game

If you happen to be one of the many, many viewers who have already burned through all nine episodes on Netflix, you’re probably going through a lot of feelings right now. If one of them is indecision over what to watch next, we can help with that.

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The Many Saints of Newark

While it can’t be compared to The Sopranos, the prequel Many Saints of Newark opens a new angle on the anti-hero standard, and for better or worse, it will make you remember the classic HBO series even more fondly.

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You

Being in the mind of anti-hero Joe Goldberg is just as unsettling and addicting as the serial stalker’s own obsessions. If you’re not put off by that, it’s an entertaining social commentary that questions viewers’ perceptions of good, evil, and who deserves redemption.

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Gossip Girl (2021)

With a witty script packed with up-to-the-second cultural references and tear-jerking teen angst, a gorgeous cast, and a sumptuously-lit Manhattan for a backdrop, the show is a diverting addition to the teen-drama pantheon

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Y: The Last Man

Y: The Last Man is a captivating, possibly triggering story, from the first minute, when you start counting the men who are about to die and caring about the women who love them.

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Curse of the Chippendales

A can’t-look-away docu-series about the infamous male stripper group, and the drugs, envy, greed, and even murder that were rampant behind-the-scenes.

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