Zorica J

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What You Need to Know About The Gilded Age

What’s the story? Set in 1882, The Gilded Age takes us inside the elegant homes and dynamic social lives of New York City’s highest echelon. Representing the old-money faction are Agnes van Rhijn (Christine Baranski) and Ada Brook (Cynthia Nixon), a pair of well-born sisters who’ve agreed to take in their niece, Marian (Louisa Jacobson),

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Licorice Pizza

Director Paul Thomas Anderson’s love letter to how unapologetic hormones and Los Angeles can be, Licorice Pizza is a collection of engaging moments that invites you into its vintage world and make you want to stay.

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The Righteous Gemstones

A brilliant and sardonic look at the gaudy world of televangelism filled with quick one-liners and surprisingly heartfelt moments.

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The Lost Daughter

The Lost Daughter proves that Gyllenhaal has a gift for directing and screenwriting. She’s made a film about real, complex people that sticks with you.

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Twentysomethings: Austin

This series provides an honest exploration of young adulthood and all the struggles that come with it in a relatable, yet entertaining way. It serves as a refreshing reminder that humor, curiosity, and optimism can serve as important tools in trying and tumultuous times.

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Archive 81

Archive 81 is a binge-worthy, well-paced horror/sci-fi series that will keep viewers intrigued and filled with anticipation during each of its eight gripping episodes. It’s edge-of-your seat good!

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Yellowjackets

Yellowjackets is a dark and potent cocktail, mixing genres in a way that makes it fresh and different from anything you’ve seen before. It digs deep into the human psyche, testing the boundaries of what its characters (and audience) can endure, but also keeps you wanting more.

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The Tender Bar

George Clooney directs a compelling movie with relatable and easy-to-root-for characters. The Tender Bar manages to have the emotional depth of any other Oscar contender but without the expected sadness or sturm and drang.

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The Power of the Dog

The Power of the Dog delivers amazing vistas and performances, some of which may still be seared in the mind after viewing. There is a uniqueness in the story and in the acting, thanks to the joint efforts of Campion and Cumberbatch.

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Perfect Days

A meditation on finding beauty in the ordinary and dignity in manual labor, Perfect Days serves as a lesson as well as a blueprint on how to live a fulfilling and meaningful life. It underscores the importance of finding solace in solitude and happiness from the simple act of living.

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We are Lady Parts

This is a funny, endearing, fresh show that demonstrates what proper representation looks like.

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A New Mystery Series Has Some Fun with True Crime Obsessions

It arrived without much fanfare, another offbeat “true crime” mystery set against the stormy clouds of an eerie small town. But Bodkin, the new Netflix series set in Ireland, has something deeper going on. Both a revelation and a lighthearted indignation, Bodkin has something to say about conspiracy theorists, disinformation rabbit holes, the people making

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A Watercooler Guide to Shōgun

An immersive must-watch embraced by critics, the new Shōgun brings a new perspective on the epic historical drama about the battle between East and West in 17th century Japan.

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Rising Star: Our Interview with Dune & The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare‘s Babs Olusanmokun

He is best known for his recent breakout sci-fi roles – from the fierce fighter Doctor M’Benga in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds to Jamis – the Freman and best friend to the protagonist Paul – in Dune Parts One and Two.   But Babs Olusanmokun has been acting for two decades. A Nigerian-American who speaks

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The Classic Film Education in Colin Farrell’s Sugar 

The classic film education in Colin Ferrell’s Apple TV+ detective series “Sugar” has something to tell us. Our writer Felipe Patterson breaks them down and sheds light on their cultural significance.

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The Sympathizer

Told through the perspective of a conflicted hero with contradicting loyalties, The Sympathizer is an ambitious examination of a spy who can’t help but sympathize — hence, the title of the series — with the enemy. It might make you rethink everything you were taught about the Vietnam War too.

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A Career Reinvention Watchlist

As layoffs continue in the wake of a year of ominous headlines about the bots who are replacing us, a recent EY report found that over 70% of employees are reeling from AI anxiety. That actually sounds low. The idea of having to concoct a new livelihood – one that won’t be taken over by

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What Franklin Can Teach Us About Diplomacy

As conflicts rage on across the world and the need for diplomacy rises, the new Apple TV+ series Franklin — about America’s first diplomat — offers lessons for our times, as a former speechwriter for the US Ambassador to the UN explains.

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